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Jindael
Senior Scribe

USA
357 Posts

Posted - 02 Mar 2006 :  20:42:15  Show Profile  Visit Jindael's Homepage Send Jindael a Private Message
I'd just like everyone to know that I will now picture an elven George Cloony as Eliath.

"You don't have a Soul. You are a Soul. You have a body."
-- C.S. Lewis
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ElaineCunningham
Forgotten Realms Author

2391 Posts

Posted - 02 Mar 2006 :  21:05:09  Show Profile  Visit ElaineCunningham's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by Kajehase

Puns should be encouraged. I'd be a bit worried for said eleven though (unless it's the Manchester United starting-eleven at least *evil cackle*).

Where's my daddy?
Is that my daddy?
He goes, "Bugrit! Millenium hand and shrimp!"
He is Foul Ole Ron!
That's not my daddy!



Another Pratchett fan!

And "bugrit" is the best new profanity variation I've come across in decades.

Interesting, how American movies and books adopt British slang as a tapdancing routine. It's quite acceptible for characters to say "bugger it" and "sod off," whereas the American equivalent would not be permitted. Or IS it the equivalent? How vulgar does "The Spy Who Shagged Me" sound to someone in the UK, vis a vis the term Americans commonly employ to describe the same activity?

Just curious.


Edited by - ElaineCunningham on 02 Mar 2006 21:12:19
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ElaineCunningham
Forgotten Realms Author

2391 Posts

Posted - 02 Mar 2006 :  21:15:01  Show Profile  Visit ElaineCunningham's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by Jindael

I'd just like everyone to know that I will now picture an elven George Cloony as Elaith.


Do try to nip that propensity in the bud.

If you must have a visual hook, I'd suggest Timothy Dalton, as he appeared in the role of a young King Philip of France in the movie "The Lion in Winter."


Edited by - ElaineCunningham on 02 Mar 2006 21:26:46
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Gerath Hoan
Learned Scribe

United Kingdom
152 Posts

Posted - 02 Mar 2006 :  21:29:53  Show Profile Send Gerath Hoan a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by ElaineCunningham
Interesting, how American movies and books adopt British slang as a tapdancing routine. It's quite acceptible for characters to say "bugger it" and "sod off," whereas the American equivalent would not be permitted. Or IS it the equivalent? How vulgar does "The Spy Who Shagged Me" sound to someone in the UK, vis a vis the term Americans commonly employ to describe the same activity?

Just curious.



Hi Elaine,

Just to give you a British (well, English to be precise) opinion, I don't think "The Spy Who Shagged Me" is especially offensive, but the term is a bit lower class. I think we Brits are more concious of class things like that.

I am sometimes amazed by how Americans can get away with certain terms, such as the recent phrase that seems to have caught on in the US (which I won't directly repeat here) that was combined with the term "Gangsta" to create "****sta". Well I've heard that original word used uncensored on American TV, I suspect because there's less shock value to it there. It's just not as offensive a term to Americans as it is to the British. In every schoolyard across the UK kids use that word to strongly insult each other, so it is quite a vulgar term, not quite up with the "F" word, but certainly not a polite term of endearment!

I like comparing slang variations (not just profanity, but all kinds of terminology) across cultures, but it's a shame that TV and popular culture is starting to merge these things. Take the term "Ass" for example. Over here it should always be "Arse", but in the last decade or so the American version is taking over.

Anyways, I don't want to sidetrack your thread, Elaine and I'm certainly not trying to post profanity (Apologies to all if what I've posted is taken that way). Just thought it was too interesting not to offer you an informed opinion from this side of the pond.

GH

Knight of the Order of the Keen Eye - Granted by Ed Greenwood, 30th January 2005

Edited by - Gerath Hoan on 02 Mar 2006 21:32:20
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ElaineCunningham
Forgotten Realms Author

2391 Posts

Posted - 02 Mar 2006 :  21:33:59  Show Profile  Visit ElaineCunningham's Homepage
Much appreciated! I'm always curious about word nuances.
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Gerath Hoan
Learned Scribe

United Kingdom
152 Posts

Posted - 02 Mar 2006 :  21:39:14  Show Profile Send Gerath Hoan a Private Message
Anytime!

I've been to the States enough to have a good perspective on our particular linguistic differences (indeed, my parents now live out there).

You seem to have strong Celtic interests in your work Elaine, have you visited any of the British Isles?

Knight of the Order of the Keen Eye - Granted by Ed Greenwood, 30th January 2005
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ElaineCunningham
Forgotten Realms Author

2391 Posts

Posted - 02 Mar 2006 :  21:57:31  Show Profile  Visit ElaineCunningham's Homepage
My family had a holiday in Scotland about six years ago. We went in August, so we were in Edinburgh for the festival and were able to get tickets to the Tattoo. A couple of years later, we spent a week in southern England. Apart from some time in London and Bath, it was essentially an Arthurian pilgrimage. My husband and I spent a week in Ireland as a special anniversary trip, and I took my mother to Ireland the following year. So yes, four trips. Can't wait to return! I'm hoping to a research trip, visiting some of the sites associated with James VI and I.
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Gerath Hoan
Learned Scribe

United Kingdom
152 Posts

Posted - 02 Mar 2006 :  22:03:21  Show Profile Send Gerath Hoan a Private Message
I don't yet know Scotland so well, but my girlfriend's parents live there now so I expect to learn more about it as time goes on.

I spent about 15 years living in the south west of England, about 20 minutes drive from Bath. What did you think of the area? What other places did you visit in the South? Glastonbury?

Knight of the Order of the Keen Eye - Granted by Ed Greenwood, 30th January 2005
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Kajehase
Great Reader

Sweden
2104 Posts

Posted - 02 Mar 2006 :  22:49:37  Show Profile Send Kajehase a Private Message
Sorry for continuing the sidetracking of the thread, but I have an interest in word nuances and well, words all on their own as well.

I'm not going to make any comments on the American vs British English because, well, I'm Swedish. But I do have a few comments I'd like to make.

quote:
Originally posted by Gerath Hoan

Just to give you a British (well, English to be precise) opinion, I don't think "The Spy Who Shagged Me" is especially offensive, but the term is a bit lower class. I think we Brits are more concious of class things like that.


Guess my blue-collarness is showing through here, but I've loved the word "shag" and all its permutations ever since I first learned about it. But then again, I think this is one of those words that has to be spoken with a thick accent that isn't the standard American-TV-accent (which I've no idea what the real name for is) to sound good.

quote:
I like comparing slang variations (not just profanity, but all kinds of terminology) across cultures, but it's a shame that TV and popular culture is starting to merge these things. Take the term "Ass" for example. Over here it should always be "Arse", but in the last decade or so the American version is taking over.


I have to admit that particular example is baffling to me, the "rs" makes it so much easier to do things with the word than with a simple "ss" (SS being a different kind of profanity of course)

quote:
Anyways, I don't want to sidetrack your thread, Elaine

Um... me too
quote:
and I'm certainly not trying to post profanity (Apologies to all if what I've posted is taken that way).


Now, while I don't want to encourage profanities (too much of that on the internet as it is), I'm still going to offer my opinion that a person who never uses them easily can sound very bland. A carefully placed use of the f-word or of another profanity can serve very well to bring home a point beyond saying that something was "really" so and so. - But still, I'm sorry for bringing up the name of that football-team. Much too foul language, that.

(Not to mention that one need something to shout/mutter/grumble when one manages to stub a toe on the threshold of a doorway, hit oneself on the thumb with a hammer, or miss an open goal whilst playing football).

There is a rumour going around that I have found god. I think is unlikely because I have enough difficulty finding my keys, and there is empirical evidence that they exist.
Terry Pratchett
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Kajehase
Great Reader

Sweden
2104 Posts

Posted - 02 Mar 2006 :  22:52:18  Show Profile Send Kajehase a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by ElaineCunningham

Another Pratchett fan!


Actually, seeing as I started to buy books in English because the translations of Terry Pratchett's books were so far behind in Sweden, he is, by extension, probably responsible for me purchasing your books as well. So with that though in mind I just became an even bigger Pratchett-fan than I was before

There is a rumour going around that I have found god. I think is unlikely because I have enough difficulty finding my keys, and there is empirical evidence that they exist.
Terry Pratchett
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ElaineCunningham
Forgotten Realms Author

2391 Posts

Posted - 02 Mar 2006 :  23:19:31  Show Profile  Visit ElaineCunningham's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by Gerath Hoan

I spent about 15 years living in the south west of England, about 20 minutes drive from Bath. What did you think of the area? What other places did you visit in the South? Glastonbury?


I love Bath. The downtown part of the city is like a Georgian time capsule--you can easily envision Jane Austin's characters strolling down the streets. The Roman ruins were amazing. We did a ghost walk--very entertaining storyteller--took a boat ride up the Avon, did a great deal of walking.

Arthurian sites included Glastonbury, Cadbury "castle," Tintagel, Amesbury, Stonehenge. We climbed the Tor, of course. (We also got lost in Wales, and didn't go as far as I would have liked.) Tintagel was amazing, and very evocative. I would have been happy to sit at the edge of the cliff for days on end, scribbling madly in notebook after notebook. I had a hard time convincing my family that sites which are linked with the Arthurian legends are just as interesting as those which have possible historical connections. When my husband asked if I wanted to have a picture taken at the site of "Arthur's grave" in Glastonbury Abbey, my older son murmurred, "A picture of the place where the grave used to be of a man who probably never existed--now THAT'S a keeper..."

We went through many charming "wee towns," as the same son called them, visited several cathedrals and public gardens, and were fortunate to visit Windsor Castle when the gardens were open to the public. (Apparently that doesn't happen too often.) We went to Cheddar Gorge and walked through a couple sets of caves. We only had a day in London, but we were able to see King Lear at the rebuilt Globe Theatre.
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WalkerNinja
Senior Scribe

USA
573 Posts

Posted - 03 Mar 2006 :  00:33:36  Show Profile Send WalkerNinja a Private Message
Elaine,

I'm a long time admirer of your work (Realms and others)and was wondering something the other day. You've written an awful alot on the elves of Faerun, and (to me at least) seem to have been type-cast by TSR/Wizards. I was wondering if there were any non-elven areas of Faerun that you're specially interested in, or have any non-elven realmsian stories that you're aching to tell.

Thank for all your work (published and not)

-Walker

*** A Forgotten Realms Addict since 1990 ***
Treasures of the Past, a Second Edition Play-by-Post game for and by Candlekeep Sages--http://www.rpol.net/game.cgi?gi=52011
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ElaineCunningham
Forgotten Realms Author

2391 Posts

Posted - 03 Mar 2006 :  01:06:10  Show Profile  Visit ElaineCunningham's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by WalkerNinja

I'm a long time admirer of your work (Realms and others)and was wondering something the other day. You've written an awful alot on the elves of Faerun, and (to me at least) seem to have been type-cast by TSR/Wizards. I was wondering if there were any non-elven areas of Faerun that you're specially interested in, or have any non-elven realmsian stories that you're aching to tell.


Well met, Walker. Thanks for the kind words.

I have written quite a few books with elven characters, but am I type-cast as WotC's "elf lady?" Hmm . . . Probably not. A lot of other people write about elves. I'd do more stories about humans, but I know so little about them.

Let's see--non-elf FR stories. I'd like to see more done with dwarven culture. I'm interested in bards, and would like to see a story set in Silverymoon and thereabouts, something with a mystery/thriller plot.
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
36773 Posts

Posted - 03 Mar 2006 :  01:08:04  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message
Walker, you are familiar with her Counselors & Kings trilogy, are you not? It's set in Halruaa...

Candlekeep Forums Moderator

Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
http://www.candlekeep.com
-- Candlekeep Forum Code of Conduct

I am the Giant Space Hamster of Ill Omen!
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Berzerker_prime
Acolyte

USA
12 Posts

Posted - 03 Mar 2006 :  01:15:48  Show Profile  Visit Berzerker_prime's Homepage Send Berzerker_prime a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Kajehase
Now, while I don't want to encourage profanities (too much of that on the internet as it is), I'm still going to offer my opinion that a person who never uses them easily can sound very bland. A carefully placed use of the f-word or of another profanity can serve very well to bring home a point beyond saying that something was "really" so and so. - But still, I'm sorry for bringing up the name of that football-team. Much too foul language, that.


Of course, at the other end of the debate, some of the best insults I've heard have no profanities in them at all. It's always a wonderful feeling to hurl a string of large and alliterative words at someone only to have them respond with "Ummmm... b****...?"

Of course, I almost always ended up on the wrong end of a fist afterward. The plight of the nerd.

Sorry, I'll stop helping the side-track, now.

Sweet water to you.

Berz.

*******
Berzerker_prime
Nen lend ah lalaith lim, darthol i lĂș aphadad govatham.

Gaming quote of the week:
"Why does everyone assume I have a plan?"
"Because you were giving the orders!"
- Scondora and Elara, Fellowship of the Ever-Falling Troll.

RIP Alton Goodbarrel. We shalt always remember thee for thy ability to find traps... the hard way... even when yon 350 lb Dwarf walks over them first without triggering them.
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Lameth
Learned Scribe

Germany
196 Posts

Posted - 03 Mar 2006 :  06:35:27  Show Profile  Visit Lameth's Homepage Send Lameth a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by ElaineCunningham

My family had a holiday in Scotland about six years ago. We went in August, so we were in Edinburgh for the festival and were able to get tickets to the Tattoo. A couple of years later, we spent a week in southern England. Apart from some time in London and Bath, it was essentially an Arthurian pilgrimage. My husband and I spent a week in Ireland as a special anniversary trip, and I took my mother to Ireland the following year. So yes, four trips. Can't wait to return! I'm hoping to a research trip, visiting some of the sites associated with James VI and I.



Scotland is a great country. We spent 10 days in 2005 there. From Edinburgh to Sterling, Sterling Castle, Robert the Bruce` grave, Rob Roys Grave. Then we went north to Inverness and get the first views of the scotish landscape. From Inverness southwest along the Loch Ness to the Monster Centre, there we make a boat trip with a monsterhunter boat. Then we drove west to the isle of sky and visited the Eilean Donan Castle (Highlander) on the way. Back from the isle we went south to Fort William an from there back to Sterling an Edingurgh.
Great country, the Highlands are a MUST SEE, there are so many things to do and there was so little time....argh.
But the trip was Great!
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Gerath Hoan
Learned Scribe

United Kingdom
152 Posts

Posted - 03 Mar 2006 :  10:11:58  Show Profile Send Gerath Hoan a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Kajehase
Now, while I don't want to encourage profanities (too much of that on the internet as it is), I'm still going to offer my opinion that a person who never uses them easily can sound very bland. A carefully placed use of the f-word or of another profanity can serve very well to bring home a point beyond saying that something was "really" so and so. - But still, I'm sorry for bringing up the name of that football-team. Much too foul language, that.


Thanks for your comments, Kajehase. I do agree with you here. Have you seen the Big Lebowski? There's a great bit where the Dude is called up on how many cuss words he uses. I won't post his response, but it's funny as hell.

Also, what's your issue with that particular famous football team, might I ask? I'm a Man City fan, so you can expect me not to like them very much.

quote:
(Not to mention that one need something to shout/mutter/grumble when one manages to stub a toe on the threshold of a doorway, hit oneself on the thumb with a hammer, or miss an open goal whilst playing football).



You've seen Wayne Rooney on TV then? You don't need to lip read to understand what he's saying!

Knight of the Order of the Keen Eye - Granted by Ed Greenwood, 30th January 2005
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Gerath Hoan
Learned Scribe

United Kingdom
152 Posts

Posted - 03 Mar 2006 :  10:21:58  Show Profile Send Gerath Hoan a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by ElaineCunningham
I love Bath. The downtown part of the city is like a Georgian time capsule--you can easily envision Jane Austin's characters strolling down the streets. The Roman ruins were amazing. We did a ghost walk--very entertaining storyteller--took a boat ride up the Avon, did a great deal of walking.


All good stuff... did you know people in Jane Austin syle costume do regularly walk down the streets in Bath? Ghost Walks are good, but to go on the best you have to come to the most haunted city in the country, York.

Also, did you see the blue statue man who stands on the high street? I swear that guy is there six days a week, and he has been doing that for at least twelve years now!

quote:
Arthurian sites included Glastonbury, Cadbury "castle," Tintagel, Amesbury, Stonehenge.


Amesbury? I don't recognise it. Did you mean Avesbury? That's the site of a larger stone circle and probably one of my favourite historical sites in the country.

quote:
I had a hard time convincing my family that sites which are linked with the Arthurian legends are just as interesting as those which have possible historical connections. When my husband asked if I wanted to have a picture taken at the site of "Arthur's grave" in Glastonbury Abbey, my older son murmurred, "A picture of the place where the grave used to be of a man who probably never existed--now THAT'S a keeper..."


But all history is a bit like that, of course Arthur is even more difficult as he is a figure many consider to be straight out of myth. But all history is about a bit of imagination and guess work. Maybe it's just my gamer's instincts coming through, but I love all that stuff.

quote:
We went through many charming "wee towns," as the same son called them, visited several cathedrals and public gardens, and were fortunate to visit Windsor Castle when the gardens were open to the public. (Apparently that doesn't happen too often.) We went to Cheddar Gorge and walked through a couple sets of caves. We only had a day in London, but we were able to see King Lear at the rebuilt Globe Theatre.



I like the phrase, there's lots of nice small towns throughout the country. I grew up in a "small market town" and I'm fiercely proud of that background. There's nothing wrong with not coming from one of the bigger cities. At least I'm not Scouse (from Liverpool)!

Cheddar Gorge is a good place to visit with great views. As for the Globe, I'm still looking to find the time and the cash to get myself down to London for a good production.

One last quick question of you, playing on the American/British culture clash... do you drink Beer? What did you think of it over here? Most Americans seem to think we drink warm lager (not true)!

GH

Knight of the Order of the Keen Eye - Granted by Ed Greenwood, 30th January 2005
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ElaineCunningham
Forgotten Realms Author

2391 Posts

Posted - 03 Mar 2006 :  12:07:06  Show Profile  Visit ElaineCunningham's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by Gerath Hoan
All good stuff... did you know people in Jane Austin syle costume do regularly walk down the streets in Bath? Ghost Walks are good, but to go on the best you have to come to the most haunted city in the country, York.


We didn't get to York. I'd very much like to go, but for the history rather than the hauntings.

quote:
Also, did you see the blue statue man who stands on the high street? I swear that guy is there six days a week, and he has been doing that for at least twelve years now!


Nope. Smurf guy must have been taking a break when we were there.

quote:
Arthurian sites included Glastonbury, Cadbury "castle," Tintagel, Amesbury, Stonehenge.


quote:
Amesbury? I don't recognise it. Did you mean Avesbury? That's the site of a larger stone circle and probably one of my favourite historical sites in the country.


Oops. Yes, indeed.

quote:
But all history is a bit like that, of course Arthur is even more difficult as he is a figure many consider to be straight out of myth. But all history is about a bit of imagination and guess work. Maybe it's just my gamer's instincts coming through, but I love all that stuff.


Andrew is the more avid gamer, but surprisingly it was Sean who fell in love with Cadbury. There's nothing to see there but the hill itself and the gorgeous view of the countryside, but the shape is very evocative. It really does look as if there are remnants of a winding road and the dirt fortifications built to support the wooden battlements. For those who don't know of Cadbury, it's one of several places put forth as the possible site of Camelot. Archeological digs have found evidence of a 6th century settlement, including trade goods from the Mediterannean, which argues for a city of some wealth and influence. It is probably the most defensible location in the area, and it has a clear line of sight to Glastonbury Tor. Now, back to gaming. Sean was not quite 11 at the time, and he was very busy little DM, running happily around and designing Camelot in his mind's eye. Lovely site, and completely non-commercial--the hill is on someone's farm. Access is permitted, as long as you walk up a narrow cattle path to get to it. We were the only ones there at the time. Very interesting experience.

quote:
Cheddar Gorge is a good place to visit with great views. As for the Globe, I'm still looking to find the time and the cash to get myself down to London for a good production.


The Cheddar Gorge area is very pretty. Right around the caves is exceedingly commercial, but it IS a great place to take kids. I was impressed with the story of Cheddar man--the mummified corpse found in the cave. Carbon dating puts him back about 4000 years, and DNA testing revealed that he has a descendant living in the area. Talk about a home-town boy. ("Yes, indeed--my people have been here for, well, millinia...") Attending a performation at the Globe isn't very expensive, but London itself? Yikes!

quote:
One last quick question of you, playing on the American/British culture clash... do you drink Beer? What did you think of it over here? Most Americans seem to think we drink warm lager (not true)!


I'm not much of a beer drinker, but when I travel I'll try whatever's local. I'm here to tell you that Guiness doesn't take to ocean travel, but it's wonderful in its native land (and it island-hops pretty well, too!) In Ireland I preferred Smithwick, a light ale brewed in Kilkenny. I don't recall a specific English beer, but I had a couple I liked. Scrumpy, on the other hand, isn't an experience I'm in any hurry to repeat. I didn't know apples could DO that.
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Gerath Hoan
Learned Scribe

United Kingdom
152 Posts

Posted - 03 Mar 2006 :  20:14:42  Show Profile Send Gerath Hoan a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by ElaineCunningham
We didn't get to York. I'd very much like to go, but for the history rather than the hauntings.


Well if you're ever in the area, I'll give you the tour!

quote:

Andrew is the more avid gamer, but surprisingly it was Sean who fell in love with Cadbury. There's nothing to see there but the hill itself and the gorgeous view of the countryside, but the shape is very evocative. It really does look as if there are remnants of a winding road and the dirt fortifications built to support the wooden battlements. For those who don't know of Cadbury, it's one of several places put forth as the possible site of Camelot. Archeological digs have found evidence of a 6th century settlement, including trade goods from the Mediterannean, which argues for a city of some wealth and influence. It is probably the most defensible location in the area, and it has a clear line of sight to Glastonbury Tor. Now, back to gaming. Sean was not quite 11 at the time, and he was very busy little DM, running happily around and designing Camelot in his mind's eye. Lovely site, and completely non-commercial--the hill is on someone's farm. Access is permitted, as long as you walk up a narrow cattle path to get to it. We were the only ones there at the time. Very interesting experience.


I don't know the place from personal experience, but I've seen it on television. I've been to a Roman fort that was much the same, but brought to life even better by some crazy re-enactment people dressed as a local Roman Legion.

quote:

Attending a performation at the Globe isn't very expensive, but London itself? Yikes!


Hence my dilemma!

quote:

I'm not much of a beer drinker, but when I travel I'll try whatever's local. I'm here to tell you that Guiness doesn't take to ocean travel, but it's wonderful in its native land (and it island-hops pretty well, too!) In Ireland I preferred Smithwick, a light ale brewed in Kilkenny. I don't recall a specific English beer, but I had a couple I liked. Scrumpy, on the other hand, isn't an experience I'm in any hurry to repeat. I didn't know apples could DO that.





I can't blame you at all for the Scrumpy thing! It is pretty powerful stuff!

GH

Knight of the Order of the Keen Eye - Granted by Ed Greenwood, 30th January 2005
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dannyfu
Learned Scribe

USA
108 Posts

Posted - 08 Mar 2006 :  02:39:09  Show Profile  Visit dannyfu's Homepage Send dannyfu a Private Message
Elaine, I would just like to thank you as a result of my completion of Evermeet. It truly is the Silmarillion of the realms. As much as i enjoy the adventuring books, I must say I am such a fan of the history or history making novels. I have made posts before regarding the Last Mythal discussing my love for it as well as my doubts that all will be wrapped up by the end of the series. Rich has done a great job so far and I can't wait to read the final book, but I imagine he will leave an open end to many areas he touched in the series. Since you set many a standard for the elves intially, I would love to see you do another epic level book like Evermeet regarding the current events of the elves of faerun. Do you see anything like that happening with the outcome of the Last Mythal this June? Thank you again.
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ElaineCunningham
Forgotten Realms Author

2391 Posts

Posted - 08 Mar 2006 :  04:38:16  Show Profile  Visit ElaineCunningham's Homepage
Thanks for the kind words, dannyfu.

I suppose anything's possible, but I don't foresee circumstances arising that would lead to me doing a sequel to Evermeet.
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dannyfu
Learned Scribe

USA
108 Posts

Posted - 08 Mar 2006 :  05:53:16  Show Profile  Visit dannyfu's Homepage Send dannyfu a Private Message
wow, thanks for the quick response! that is too bad though. i still look foward to reading whatever you have for us all in the future. thanks again
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Steven Schend
Forgotten Realms Designer & Author

USA
1704 Posts

Posted - 08 Mar 2006 :  13:43:10  Show Profile  Visit Steven Schend's Homepage Send Steven Schend a Private Message
Hi Elaine. Just stopping by to say hi and agree with you and yours in the above threads.

Smithwick's is a good beer for regular drinking, and yes, Guinness in the UK is lightning compared to the lightning bug of the pasteurized stuff we get imported over here.

And you already know that I fell in love with York and its ghost walks from my wee trip to Britain in 1996. Gotta get to some of those places you mentioned.....but I'll save more of this for an email.

SES

For current projects and general natter, see www.steveneschend.com
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ElaineCunningham
Forgotten Realms Author

2391 Posts

Posted - 08 Mar 2006 :  13:49:59  Show Profile  Visit ElaineCunningham's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by Steven Schend

Hi Elaine. Just stopping by to say hi and agree with you and yours in the above threads.

Smithwick's is a good beer for regular drinking, and yes, Guinness in the UK is lightning compared to the lightning bug of the pasteurized stuff we get imported over here.

And you already know that I fell in love with York and its ghost walks from my wee trip to Britain in 1996. Gotta get to some of those places you mentioned.....but I'll save more of this for an email.

SES



We didn't get to York, and I'd dearly love to go. I even think I'd like to duplicate your experience of getting lost in the medieval city during a ghost tour. I doubt that will be difficult for me, as I managed to get lost during the EverQuest online tutorial. Twice.

Sad but true.
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Alaundo
Head Moderator
Admin

United Kingdom
5690 Posts

Posted - 08 Mar 2006 :  21:13:37  Show Profile  Visit Alaundo's Homepage Send Alaundo a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by ElaineCunningham

We didn't get to York, and I'd dearly love to go. I even think I'd like to duplicate your experience of getting lost in the medieval city during a ghost tour. I doubt that will be difficult for me, as I managed to get lost during the EverQuest online tutorial. Twice.

Sad but true.





Well met

Ahh, York, a splendid place indeed I make a point of going every year for a long weekend without fail. The place has so much going for it that I am completely charmed time and time again.

Alaundo
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Kajehase
Great Reader

Sweden
2104 Posts

Posted - 11 Mar 2006 :  21:07:47  Show Profile Send Kajehase a Private Message
A question brought on by Elaine's comment about the likeness of my avatar and the character it's supposed to look like (Taeros Hawkwinter from The City of Splendors - brown hair, in his early twenties, and, in my mind, wearing clothes a bit more flamboyant than the checked jacket in the avatar-picture):

How do you as a writer react when you see a rendition of one of a character you've created that's so off the mark - Bemused resignation, screaming fits (I sure hope not, or something in between?

(Note: I like the picture in my avatar, Vincent Dutrait has become one of my favourite artists after his work in Dragon 334, and 335, but I don't see it as anywhere near the Taeros I envisioned when reading the book).

Oh, and thanks for the link to Kay Allen's picture Elaine, she's also become a favourite now.

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Zsych
Acolyte

28 Posts

Posted - 12 Mar 2006 :  19:15:04  Show Profile  Visit Zsych's Homepage Send Zsych a Private Message
Hello Elaine.

Must say, i love your books(though i couldn't really interest myself in the Spelljammer books... have to be honest :))

Anyway, i have a question regarding elves and Shadow-magic.

As you've portrayed them, elves are a part of the Weave(or the Weave is part of them).

I would think in such circumstances that taking up the Shadow-weave should have unfortunate effects on an elf, especially as he becomes more and more dissociated from the Weave.

Now this may or may not have great meaning in game terms, but i'd think that on a lore level, it should have some effect.
Much like how spellfire is portrayed as something out of Star Trek, in the novels, while being only 4d12 <cough> <cough> in the game.

Not to say that you couldn't port the lore side to the game side for rather intriguing situations.
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ElaineCunningham
Forgotten Realms Author

2391 Posts

Posted - 13 Mar 2006 :  11:48:34  Show Profile  Visit ElaineCunningham's Homepage
quote:
Originally posted by Zsych
Must say, i love your books(though i couldn't really interest myself in the Spelljammer books... have to be honest.


Thanks for the kind words, and no worries on the Spelljammer. Bipedal blue hippomotomi and giant space hamsters are not everyone's cup of tea.

quote:
Anyway, i have a question regarding elves and Shadow-magic.

As you've portrayed them, elves are a part of the Weave(or the Weave is part of them).

I would think in such circumstances that taking up the Shadow-weave should have unfortunate effects on an elf, especially as he becomes more and more dissociated from the Weave.

Now this may or may not have great meaning in game terms, but i'd think that on a lore level, it should have some effect.
Much like how spellfire is portrayed as something out of Star Trek, in the novels, while being only 4d12 <cough> <cough> in the game.

Not to say that you couldn't port the lore side to the game side for rather intriguing situations.



This IS a very good question, but I'm not sure how best to approach it. I wrote about elves under second edition rules. Third edition elves are pointedly different. I haven't gone through the mental exercise of trying to layer all the ramifications of 3E on "my" elves and come up with lore material that explains the variances.

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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High

Australia
31701 Posts

Posted - 13 Mar 2006 :  13:43:48  Show Profile Send The Sage a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by ElaineCunningham

...giant space hamsters are not everyone's cup of tea.
Unless of course, their name is Wooly Rupert and they are a resident scribe here at Candlekeep well-known for their ability in mischief-making .

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