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Elfinblade
Senior Scribe

Norway
377 Posts

Posted - 19 Apr 2010 :  22:07:04  Show Profile Send Elfinblade a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Amazing effort Kyrene! This will prove handy indeed :)
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Alisttair
Great Reader

Canada
3054 Posts

Posted - 06 May 2010 :  15:10:40  Show Profile  Visit Alisttair's Homepage Send Alisttair a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Finally looked at this. Very well done. Lots of work in there for sure.

Karsite Arcanar (Most Holy Servant of Karsus)

Anauria - Survivor State of Netheril as penned by me:
http://www.dmsguild.com/m/product/172023
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Ergdusch
Master of Realmslore

Germany
1720 Posts

Posted - 07 May 2010 :  12:14:06  Show Profile Send Ergdusch a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I found another word of the Realms for your list:

"itchy" or "itchies" [plural] - professional assassins often reffered to adveturers as "itchies" - as in, itching to prove themselves, itching for a fight. (Twilight Falling, The Erevis Cale Trilogy Book I, p. 52 by Paul S. Kemp)

"Das Gras weht im Wind, wenn der Wind weht."

Edited by - Ergdusch on 07 May 2010 12:17:56
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Ergdusch
Master of Realmslore

Germany
1720 Posts

Posted - 09 May 2010 :  22:02:13  Show Profile Send Ergdusch a Private Message  Reply with Quote
While gathering more cormyr-related information I came across yet another word/phrase of the Realms:

"roadship" - peddler's carts, sturdy wooden boxes on four wheels in which merchants stored their goods for travel. (Twilight Falling, The Erevis Cale Trilogy Book I, p. 33 by Paul S. Kemp)

"Das Gras weht im Wind, wenn der Wind weht."
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Kyrene
Senior Scribe

South Africa
705 Posts

Posted - 10 May 2010 :  08:42:26  Show Profile  Visit Kyrene's Homepage Send Kyrene a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks Ergdusch. I have the Cale books so I will be sure to look up those references and add them to the list.

Lost for words? Find them in the Glossary of Phrases, Sayings & Words of the Realms
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The_Silversword
Seeker

USA
58 Posts

Posted - 19 May 2010 :  11:30:12  Show Profile Send The_Silversword a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Awesome list man! Found one for you while reading through The North Box set: Rainspout, a large-brimmed hat.-page 5 of the Cities book in the box set.

I survived the Spellplague and all I got was this stupid sig.
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Kyrene
Senior Scribe

South Africa
705 Posts

Posted - 19 May 2010 :  17:50:04  Show Profile  Visit Kyrene's Homepage Send Kyrene a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks The_Silversword. Duly added (along with "Amphailan", to help describe it).

Lost for words? Find them in the Glossary of Phrases, Sayings & Words of the Realms
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gomez
Learned Scribe

Netherlands
254 Posts

Posted - 04 Jun 2010 :  20:51:57  Show Profile  Visit gomez's Homepage Send gomez a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I am missing coinlass and pleasurelass.
A coinlass (not sure where I saw it used) is a prostitute, I believe a pleasurelass (used in City of Splendor) is a bit of a broader term (more like a nightclub dancer, I think).
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coach
Senior Scribe

USA
479 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  01:14:47  Show Profile Send coach a Private Message  Reply with Quote
K. Miscellaneous
1. Vaasan sayings
a. “Even the tallest horse would wet its belly” [saying about Vaasan bogs] (FR9 p3)
b. “A man’s word is more precious than his life” [Vaasan honesty] (RoS p97)
c. "The fur of the clever fox is finest" (Summ p99)
d. "Sharing the fur" [Vaasan saying for monogamy] (Summ p264)
e. "Life Pledge" [Vaasan term for monogamy] (Summ p264)
f. "In love and death, only the gods choose" [Vaasans believe you can't choose these two things yourself] (Summ p269)

Bloodstone Lands Sage
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coach
Senior Scribe

USA
479 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  01:20:10  Show Profile Send coach a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Vaasan women "always in season" [Vaasan women are promiscuous] (Siege p169)

"ice-hatched" [derogatory term towards Vaasans] (Siege)

Bloodstone Lands Sage
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coach
Senior Scribe

USA
479 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  01:22:24  Show Profile Send coach a Private Message  Reply with Quote
"Deed not Blood" [Narfell tribal leaders decided by combat prowess not bloodlines] (FRCS p108)

Bloodstone Lands Sage
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coach
Senior Scribe

USA
479 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  01:28:37  Show Profile Send coach a Private Message  Reply with Quote
i have a gillion more of these from Bloodstone Lands area, will post em a lil at a time as i get time

Bloodstone Lands Sage
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Kyrene
Senior Scribe

South Africa
705 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  12:26:35  Show Profile  Visit Kyrene's Homepage Send Kyrene a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by gomez

I am missing coinlass and pleasurelass.
A coinlass (not sure where I saw it used) is a prostitute, I believe a pleasurelass (used in City of Splendor) is a bit of a broader term (more like a nightclub dancer, I think).


Duly added to my TODO: list.
Edit: I came accross only one reference to "coinlass", and the context doesn't make it clear enough to use as a citation.
Was "pleasurelass" in the CoS novel, or the sourcebook?

Lost for words? Find them in the Glossary of Phrases, Sayings & Words of the Realms

Edited by - Kyrene on 05 Jun 2010 13:12:32
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Kyrene
Senior Scribe

South Africa
705 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  12:29:03  Show Profile  Visit Kyrene's Homepage Send Kyrene a Private Message  Reply with Quote
coach,

Can I ask you to repost all the above, but in context as you found them in your sources, to me in a PM? I don't have FR9, and I'm not sure what "RoS", "Summ" or "Siege" are. And if it's a PM, we don't run the risk of posting too much from copyrighted material.
The FRCS one I'll add as soon as I can added.

Lost for words? Find them in the Glossary of Phrases, Sayings & Words of the Realms

Edited by - Kyrene on 05 Jun 2010 13:54:18
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rjfras
Learned Scribe

261 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  14:01:34  Show Profile  Visit rjfras's Homepage Send rjfras a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by gomez

I am missing coinlass and pleasurelass.
A coinlass (not sure where I saw it used) is a prostitute, I believe a pleasurelass (used in City of Splendor) is a bit of a broader term (more like a nightclub dancer, I think).



From the Ask Ed files:

In the list that follows, "ND" means 'not derogatory,' a neutral, formal term, acceptable in polite society conversations, proclamations, etc. "M" means mild (common figure of speech, not really an insult), and "E" means derived from Elvish slang. Also, assume descriptive phrases to be Common, and unfamiliar (invented) words to be words from various other languages and local dialects, adopted into Common. Materials inside quotation marks are pronunciations.

For obvious reasons, most of these will probably never appear in published Realms products.

male homosexual ND = liyan (E: "LEE-awwn"), praed (derived from gnome slang)
effeminate male homosexual = dathna ND, simpering man-lover
bisexual man ND = tasmar
lecher M = winker
Casanova, tireless woman-chaser = cod-loose winker
masochistic man = dusk
[note: refers to a male who enjoys self-bondage and/or being bound, being whipped or pierced or otherwise hurt]
cross-dresser (either gender) ND = saece (E: "SAY-sss")
male or female who enjoys being forcibly enspelled (including shapechanging) as part of sexual play = wild one, thaethiira (E: "thAY-th-EAR-ah")
prostitute ND = coin-lass, coin-lad
[note: the above is roughly the equivalent of our phrase "neighbourhood professional;" I haven't listed less polite euphemisms because there are literally dozens]
lesbian ND = thruss
dyke = battlebud
butch (manly woman) = harnor
submissive female M = rose
masochistic female M = dusk rose
[note: the above refers to a female who enjoys self-bondage and/or being bound, being whipped or pierced or otherwise hurt]
'loose' female = wanton, slut, sreea (E: "SREE-uh")
bisexual female = shaeda (E: "SHAY-dah")

So saith Ed.
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rjfras
Learned Scribe

261 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  14:08:17  Show Profile  Visit rjfras's Homepage Send rjfras a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Others that I have copied from Ed's answers:

blade" is a term for a young idle lad given to wild attitude and deeds (what in certain real-world times and places was called a "layabout" or "roustabout"). In Waterdeep and Cormyr, it has come to mean only young male nobles (of wild habits and speech), yes.

A "boldblade" is a rogue, chaser-of-skirts, or "bad boy" who dallies "with the ladies" (or tries to make others think he does, cultivating that image: the dashingly handsome cad who darts in through bedchamber windows late at night, pinches bottoms, and so on). This should not be confused with "Blade" (beginning in upper-case/capitals), the title of one of the rulers of Mulmaster (whereof "The High Blade" is THE top dog).

So, ahem, SOME adventurers could well be "boldblades," or labelled as such by the populace. :}

"lad" and "lass" aren't insults unless said nastily to a very pompous person of mature years: they're terms of casual endearment (like British ladies of a certain sage call everyone "love" and American salesladies of a certain age call everyone "dear") or 'neutral friendly' words to describe young persons. Old men sometimes call old women "lass" to flatter or court them, and mean it as a compliment, not an insult (it's all in the WAY it's said).

Lad, blade (a young reckless, high-spirited, or pranksome youth, especially noble or wealthy; 'highcharger' is another Sword Coast equivalent), jack (also means older male or male servant, as part of a compound word such as 'doorjack,' 'stablejack,' and so on), fist (someone who's strong or should be able to help with a physical task), boots (a traveller, usually seeking employment or good fortune), stick

Lass, maid (in many rural areas, 'maid' is short for maiden, and means unmarried and presumably virgin young female - - but in most cities, 'maid' means young female not obviously married to a male, or accompanied by a male partner, and makes no judgement whatsoever as to virginity or availability), dunlass (young girl, tomboy, girl seen out alone when the speaker thinks she shouldn't be), hipskirts (polite term for a nice-looking woman, used by either gender wishing to express friendly mild admiration but NOT rudeness or [necessarily, yet] any flirtatious invitation)

"Any lad and lass" is the Realms equivalent of "Every Tom, Dick, and Harry."
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rjfras
Learned Scribe

261 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  14:09:02  Show Profile  Visit rjfras's Homepage Send rjfras a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Cont

Almost all forms of address are REALLY insulting only when combined with other words and tones of voice, and/or context. Lots of folk in the Realms can curse quick colourfully (surprise!) and insults are therefore many and varied (if they survive into the final draft, you'll really get a sampling early in SWORDS OF EVENINGSTAR, when an angry young noblewoman is assailing a servant with a hot and colourful verbal tirade), but here are a few widely-used general insults:

neck, horse, lout (always applied to a male, to mean someone who behaves rudely, and stupidly, stubbornly, or selfishly; the rough equivalent of 'sh*thead' or "a right bastard")

haunch, dungshill, tornscabbard (always applied to a male, to mean a troublemaker who likes to start fights and/or beat up others, or vandalize, or bully, or play pranks; someone who's seen as having a mean streak, or to be sadistic)

wench (female in a subservient position, e.g. a servant; insulting only if said to someone nastily, or to a female who's NOT a servant or subservient [i.e. shouted by a backalley lout at a wealthy lady], or if said to a male)

longclaws (spitfire, bitch or witch, which are also terms used in the Realms, always applied to females of shrewish disposition [hot-tempered and harsh-tongued, or bullying])

rarecrown (as in "a proper rarecrown," this word means the sort of 'Mrs. Grundy' female who likes to control the behaviour of others around her, and pass judgement on everyone, and have such judgements agreed with [or else!])

jackslice (a murderous woman, or one who will get even through violence, either poisoning, or manipulating or deceiving others, including law-keepers, into harming those she dislikes or who've disagreed with her; someone dangerous; "an old jackslice" is the Realms term for what rural Europeans a century back would have called "an old witch;" the word "jackslice" derives from someone who literally sliced or tried to use a knife on a male - - or at least on his genitals)

kisscloak (flirt, applied to females; is a term of affection or even admiration, equivalent to "she's such a tease!")

winker (lecher, applied to both genders)

kisscock, lickhips, boldshake, daedra (all of these are insulting terms for a slut [in the modern American meaning of a wanton woman] or prostitute; note that there are many, many euphemisms for prostitutes used when one doesn't want to be really insulting, and that 'boldshake' is mild enough to be used freely in mixed company, or not taken as an insult by those who don't want to feel insulted)

staggers, oldbottle, slurk (drunkard, especially a lazy drunk who does no work or little work, and can be found drunk at all hours; applied to both genders)

spincoin (a two-faced, deceitful person of either gender)
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rjfras
Learned Scribe

261 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  14:10:49  Show Profile  Visit rjfras's Homepage Send rjfras a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Cont

Ed replies: As THO posted, “brightlass” COULD be used, but probably wouldn’t be, thanks to that more prevalent “good time girl” meaning it has acquired. The “ultra-polite” term is “confidant,” which of course has a long-established no-sex-at-all meaning, so the word is usually spoken with a wink to denote the second meaning.
The more often employed term is “my lady of the hearth” (meaning: someone I can relax and be cozy with, spending the night, with the unspoken addendums of “and have sex with” and “I pay to keep her in this haven I see her in”). Note that a “lady of the hearth” can be shared by three patrons or less (more makes her a prostitute, and I’ve already related some of the great array of Realms terms for that profession), but always implies someone installed in living quarters, and fed and clothed well, by those patrons.
There’s an old Cormyrean word, “saerla,” that means “unmarried wife,” but this means not just a mistress but “someone I’ve fathered children with,” who remains a friend (if a man says, “She used to be my saerla” it means we’re no longer on friendly terms, NOT “I’m now married or she’s now married so she can’t be called a saerla anymore”).
A new term, gaining popularity in Suzail, is “nightskirts,” which used to mean “sophisticated prostitute I can pass off as a lady of high breeding,” but is now starting to mean something like “bedmate I treat as a lady of breeding, paying for her bed and the walls around it - - because she’s worth it.”

Favor Residences: this is the polite term for city lodgings maintained by a wealthy patron for mistresses and brightlads. They are essentially the same as the family townhomes, though they vary in size and grandeur by their location and origin, and the Haldoneirs keep fourteen such places, two of them currently empty (that is, rented out on a “short-stay” basis, usually a tenday at a time, to wealthy visitors to the city, such as factors and successful merchants from Sembia) and a dozen housing partners of various family members. It should be noted that nobles who own such residences tend to keep hiding places for certain items, and “side wardrobes” for themselves, in locked or even “secret” areas of the homes, with the rest being furnished more or less as the occupant (the mistress or brightlad) desires.
The House Haldoneir favor residences are distanced from the family townhomes, and so tend to be scattered throughout the eastern half of Suzail, south of the Promenade. Of these, two are “fairly rough” (as are their occupants), and are near the harbor.
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rjfras
Learned Scribe

261 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  14:11:37  Show Profile  Visit rjfras's Homepage Send rjfras a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Cont

What's the Realms' version of "Hail the camp!"? Are there special procedures or etiquette that comes into play? How is this different between the North, Tethyr, and the Dalelands/Cormyr? Also, what about racial differences (a party of elves, of dwarves)?"

Ed replies:

The usual practice is to speak loudly, some variation on: "Ho! Peace be upon you! May we approach?" or "Firebright, swords sheathed, are we welcome?"

In Cormyr, this would change to: "In the name of the Dragon, we come in peace!" unless the speakers are Purple Dragons, War Wizards, or royal courtiers, who would say, "In the name of the King, we are [they'd identify their professions], and we come in peace!" A noble party (of one family and their retainers) might say: By the Dragon, we are of House [family name], and we come in peace! Let there be peace between us!"

In the Dales, the greeting is usually: "I ride peace, and it rides me! Ho for a place at the fire!"

In both the North and Tethyr, there's some sort of "Hail!" and self-identification, followed by "Let there be peace between us!"

Pilgrims and clerical parties usually say, "In the name of [the deity; usually a descriptive phrase such as "Lady of Mysteries" is spoken here, rather than the name], let peace live (or flower) between us!

Elves and dwarves, within their own lands, have short sung (elves) and chanted (dwarves) phrases that boil down to "Hi, we're approaching, but we come in peace!"

The elf phrase translates to:

Fair be our meeting, for our hearts are light and our swords sheathed, we hold peace in our hands and its light guides us.

The dwarf chant translates as:

We come, walking on, just walking on, no trouble here, no axe-hunger here, no feud nor fight sought here. We come. We come, as passing breeze not invader. We come.

So saith Ed.
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rjfras
Learned Scribe

261 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  14:13:02  Show Profile  Visit rjfras's Homepage Send rjfras a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Cont

what are the Faerûnian equivalents for the word-concept 'Reaver'? I'd imagine that there are all manner of words for bandits and marauders, of course - including quite a few that probably don't bear repetition in polite company - but I'd like words/phrases which convey a real sense of dread and an impression of truly bestial, over-the-top brutal savagery. An especial focus on Chondathan, elven, and Damaran terms would be nice, but you're probably a little too overloaded to be so specific, so anything you can throw my way would be appreciated.

Thanks muchly."

Ed replies:

Sure, here we go:

Common gives us the relevant terms "darkblades" for irresponsibly violent mercenaries and warriors (apt to "get out of hand" when given orders, lovers-of-violence and cruelty), "bloodhilts" and "proper bloodhilt work" for butchery and kill-everyone-for-the-satisfaction-of-it sprees, and "bloodstorms" for large and terrible slaughters (massacres that wipe out villages, genocide-like executions of everyone of a race or gender in an area, and so on).

Chondathan has "rakrathen" for professional pirates, mercenaries, and outlaws-through-choice who kill wantonly, and "garrathen" for their raids, but it also has "culdur" for berserk or maniacal slaughter.

Damaran uses "sturrulk" for senseless slaying, "lultaur" ("lull-TOR") for massacres or large-scale butchery, and "lessaelen" for wanton destruction (burning good shelter in winter or when winter is approaching, despoiling wells or food, leaving bodies to attract monstrous scavengers and so endanger others, and so on).

Elven provdes the word "essraul" for enthusiastic slaying (and the resort to killing over diplomacy or other means of dealing with foes or conflicts), and "arkhdrauth" for willful, wanton, care-for-nothing destruction. "Hahlorkh" are butchers: non-elf brutes and savages - - or (as a deadly insult) elves who behave that way (which is why some elves call drow "lorkh," implying they're all savage butchers who lost their elven nature long ago through such behaviour).

And yes, "a little too overloaded" describes my life very well, these days. :}

So saith Ed.
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rjfras
Learned Scribe

261 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  14:15:07  Show Profile  Visit rjfras's Homepage Send rjfras a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Cont

Ed replies:

Just like the recent query about snacks, this one has so many replies that I'm sure I'll miss a lot of the euphemisms employed in the Realms. However, let's have a go at a fragmentary list:

low-coin lasses

high-coin girls (obviously, this term and the preceding one refer to rates charged - - and, usually, "quality of presentation," which is to say: to charge high rates, a female usually has to be pretty if not beautiful, actress enough to enjoy her work and to portray what the client wants [from fear to innocence to tenderness, and a liking for whatever the client's preferences are], to be clean and provocatively dressed, and to operate in less than squalid surroundings)

ladies of the evening (implies the ability to function as escorts in social situations; i.e. know how to behave at a feast or formal gathering as ladies of breeding, not merely - - or perhaps not even - - sexual partners)

bedwarmers (entirely neutral and open-society-polite term, as it can imply either gender, and everything from a personal maid who literally warms a rented bed with a bedpan and then departs, perhaps never being seen by the renter, to a regular companion hired repeatedly by a given traveler on every visit to a given establishment; usually means "good, hard-working, trustworthy prostitute")

alley girls (implies low and coarse street workers, often women who literally ply their trade in alleyways by night, usually swift "offerings" for a few coins; young boys who can scrape up a copper coin between them usually get their first sight or fondle [only] of bared female flesh by visiting an alley girl in daylight)

festhall downdancers ("festhall dancers" are usually just that: dancers, though they may flirt and dance unclad or partially so; "downdancers" is the usual shorthand term for "MORE than just dancers")

lightskirts (a mild term, usually implying prostitution but can mean merely promiscuous)

looseskirts (need not be a professional; this term really means "willing woman," but is often employed to mean prostitute by folk who dare not, or don't want to be, more explicit)

snakehips (an exhibitionist and willing sexual partner who is either contortionist or acrobatic, or "willing to try" precarious sites for trysts, such as rooftops, high tree boughs, atop wagons, high windowsills, hanging from ropes or balconies, on horseback, and so on; again, need not be a professional)

low-lantern ladies (refers to the Southern [the Vilhon, Calimshan, and points south] practice of dancing, disrobing, and then lovemaking all to the subdued amber or red light of almost-shuttered lamps that have panels of one of those two hues)

willing-arms (usually used to refer to a village whore, as in "ah, this'll be the local willing-arms")

escorts (implies the acting ability and training to function as "arm candy" in social situations such as revels, feasts, and formal gatherings as persons of breeding, not necessarily sexual partners)

hard-currency girls (a term rarely heard these days; it implied that this particular prostitute wouldn't extend credit - - but almost no one does, any more, so the term is dying out except as a leering, over-the-top "scandalous" term used in some plays - - usually by a "shocked, utterly SHOCKED, my dear!" character)

courtesan (a professional "hostess" employed by a ruler at his court, to entertain important visitors; need not have a sexual role at all, but usually does; tone of voice or local knowledge implies sexual side of profession if it exists)

warmflanks (a very "polite" way of referring to prostitutes; can be said in polite social conversations by or in the hearing of anyone, including disapproving old matrons and children)

whiplovers (originally only a slighting way to refer to worshippers of Loviatar, or S&M -enjoying cultists of Shar and Bane, its use broadened to include masochists venerating Ilmater, and finally all sexual masochists; recently, has seen use in Amn, Tethyr, and Calimshan as a term for those who offer their bodies to be whipped in return for coin)

kisscoin (a polite, affectionate term for those willing to make love for pay)

footwarmer (an utterly neutral term for a paid companion of the opposite sex, who is willing to sleep with clients; usually sex is implied, but the term literally means to provide companionship in bed for the lonely, so they have a warm body to warm their feet against; increasingly, this term is applied to aging, less athletic and adventurous prostitutes)

she-eel (a snarled near-curse, implying someone who teases, takes coin, and then slips away [or robs clients], OR an approving advertisement for someone very supple and willing to use her skills for adventurous sex or to increase the pleasure of clients)

banner (a male prostitute)

skilled-laces (a prostitute of satisfying skills and performance; the term refers, of course, to unlacing garments)

darksail (someone who makes love for pay while masked, or with identity magically disguised; originally many elves and half-elves of Waterdeep used a "shiftmask" spell that covered their faces - - except for their eyes - - in amorphous darkness; this spell is sometimes cast for hire on wealthy wives and husbands who want to "cheat" at masked revels, so if their masks are torn off, their faces still can't be seen; the spell can also be cast to cloak most of the body, so once garments are removed, the body can be felt more than it can be seen, an aid in concealing wrinkles, or identifying marks that betray identity)

slyblade (prostitute who dresses as a man, to woo female clients or as protection against the disapproving or lawkeepers, when meeting male clients who know her true identity and profession very well, or are "tipped off" by prearrangement plus a card, message, or signal)

catclaw (prostitute who likes rough sex or domination, or who will for coin try to seduce others, or act the role of a slave, spouse, conquered war-captive or former rival who is now a willing lover [in other words, benefit or enhance the status of a paying client by her acting, from wearing chains and willingly accepting abuse to pretending to have been smitten by the sexual prowess of the client)

bell-ankles (a Southern term referring to the dying practice of wearing chiming bells on the ankles when dancing or lovemaking, as audible advertisements; this custom is dying out, but the phrase still sees popular use to mean prostitute willing to entertain "walk-in" clients)

slapthighs (low-rate or coarse or willing-to-be-abused prostitute; the term is descriptive, NOT pejorative)

smilecoin lass (polite term for a friendly, "nice" prostitute, especially one who will cook for, provide conversation for, and provide a bed for the night for, a client - - not just providing sex)

goldglint darling (poetic or "overly polite" term for anyone who provides sex for payment)

playpretty (a female paid for sex by soldiers or sailors)

doxy (mistress or prostitute, especially applied to women who are the shared mistresses of a select roster of men)

warmvelvet (a young, pretty or beautiful prostitute who likes to tease or act alluring or foster an air of mystery; in Silverymoon or Waterdeep, this also means a noble or wealthy young woman "playing" at being a prostitute for the thrills [or to see if she can use this as a "road away" from an unhappy home situation])

chalice (a poetic or very polite term for a prostitute, based on the poetic reference to the female as either a cup that a male drinks from, or a vessel that receives his seed)

glimmersheath (a strikingly beautiful prostitute, or a male crossdressing prostitute; in either case, the term refers to eyecatching beauty and willingly receiving the "dagger" of the male physique)

gold tigress (a prostitute who likes to wrestle with or fight [to be "conquered"] clients, or to bite and claw them; a "tigress" without the word "gold" refers to a female who is not a prostitute but has similar sexual preferences]

I could go on and on and on, because the euphemisms are endless, but these given here are the most universally understood (even if some of them are used only regionally, travelling merchants have spread word of their meaning across Faerûn). If one adds insults and curses to modify these, an entire new roster of phrases opens up, but I'd rather leave those to the inventiveness of individual DMs so as not to upset too many scribes reading this thread.

So saith Ed.
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rjfras
Learned Scribe

261 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  14:18:27  Show Profile  Visit rjfras's Homepage Send rjfras a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Cont

Battle-oaths to the Red Knight (given when smiting foes or launching an attack) include these:

"Bright wit, clear thought, keen sight!"

"Forward the Game Undying!"

"Let this game now be ended!"

"Smite smart!"

Obscenities uttered by faithful of the Red Knight when personally upset include these:

"Alavaerthus!" (equivalent of "God-damn-it!" or "Jesus ****ing Christ!" [this word, pronounced "Alah-VAER-thus," was the name of a member of the Fellowship who had a large hand in founding the church of Red Knight, but went mad in a battle and sent his forces to their dooms through a series of stupid or reckless commands; "playing Alavaerthus" is an informal Fellowship expression meaning to 'totally screw up')

"Blood of the Lady!" (equivalent of "Oh my [insert strongest personal obscenities here] God!" [used as a stronger replacement for "Alavaerthus!")

"Checkmate!" (formal, usable-in-polite-company equivalent of "Damn!" or "Shit!" or "Blast!" [invoking the name of the Lady's blade])

"Keltor!" (equivalent of "Damn!" and pronounced as "KEL-tor" [spat out swiftly])

"Teskyre!" (equivalent of "Shit!" and pronounced as "Tess-kEYE-ur")

"Witless!" (equivalent of "****!" [the strongest personal oath of a faithful of the Red Knight alludes to stupidity in strategy or tactics])

So saith Ed.
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rjfras
Learned Scribe

261 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  14:19:05  Show Profile  Visit rjfras's Homepage Send rjfras a Private Message  Reply with Quote
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Lathanderite oaths request.

Here, for you and Wooly Rupert and all who are interested, are my relevant notes on the topic.

Realms exclamations appear alphabetically, followed in parentheses (with asterisks to lessen the obscenity impact) by the real-world equivalent:

"Beard!" (contraction of "[by the] Beard of Omthas!") [Omthas was an early prophet of Lathander, last heard from over six centuries ago]

"Bitterblood!" (contraction of "By the blood of Alathan!")

"By the Beard of Omthas!" ("Holy crap!" or: "Jesus!" [profane amazement])

"By the blood of Alathan!" ("Jesus, Mary, and Joseph!" or: "Bloody hell!" or "Jesus ****ing Christ!" [profane shock or disgust]) [Alathan was a high priest of a Lathanderite temple who was martyred four centuries back for preaching the faith of Lathander by the local Tethyrian duke -- who hated and feared change, and didn't want any commoners getting uppoty ideas about starting ANYTHING new]

"Darkrose!" ("Blast!" or: "****!")

"Dawnfire!" ("Shit!")

"Dusking!" ("Damnation!")

"Redblood!" ("Bloody hell!" or "Damn!" [upset Lathanderites have been heard to say things like "They even stole the redblooding candles!" so "redblooding" is the form that lets this word be used directly in place of the real-world "bloody" or "****ing"]

"Star of the Morning!" ("My word!" [usable even when speaking to superiors in the church 'polite oath' that denotes surprise or dismay])

"Starfall!" ("Damn!" or "Blast!" [ancient oath, now considered almost poetic or flowery])

"Zustrin!" ("Bloody marvellous!" or "****ing wonderful!" [used only when pleased, but so shocked or surprised as to burst out into profanity; considered poor form by clergy of Lathander]

So saith Ed.
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rjfras
Learned Scribe

261 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  14:19:39  Show Profile  Visit rjfras's Homepage Send rjfras a Private Message  Reply with Quote
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ere are some naughty words apt to be uttered by worshippers of Bane today. Where the curse seems an invented word and no 'name origin' is given, it derives from an ancient, ill-remembered 'temple tongue' or cant used by the very early cult of Bane, to keep secret the nature of converse between priests.

"Aumarrath!" (contraction of "In memory of Aumarrath!" [Aumarrath the Tyrant-King was an early prophet of Bane, and this oath is polite enough to be used to superior clergy, denoting holy awe or satisfaction, somewhat akin to the real world: "Blood of the Virgin!" or "Name of the God!"])

"Blackfire!" ("Blood of the God!" [used in awe, admiration, or profane amazement, but never when angry or disgusted; is much less formal than "Aumarrath!"])

"Clathenar!" ("Holy crap!" or: "Jesus!" [Clathenar was an unintentional martyr of Bane whose long-ago holy service was one long sequence of disastrous screwups, so this oath is always used like a groan of dismay or spat out in despairing anger, when something has gone seriously wrong]; pronounced 'CLATH-en-ar')

"Embarranar!" (a gloating thanks to Bane for something that's gone well, or a victory, or unlooked-for aid or good fortune, roughly equivalent to a delighted: "Son of a BITCH!" or "Don't that take all!"; pronounced 'Em-bar-RAN-ar')

"Hand of Hate!" ([contraction of the rarely-heard "Feel the Hand of Hate!"] an expression only snarled at foes or victims being slain; rough equivalent of a real-world: "DIE, mother****er!")

"Holy Fist!" ("Jesus Christ!")

"Krisk!" ("Shit!")

"Lurruk!" ("Bloody hell!" or "Damn!"; pronounced 'LUR-uh-kh')

"Sark!" ("Blast!" or: "****!")

"Talar!" ("Well, damn!" [a mild expression of surprise or dismay])

"Tondrabbar!" ("To the God!" [a war-cry or exulting expression uttered when an offering is touched aflame or broken, a foe is struck, or an attack is launched (i.e. it would be the first shout of a surprise attack); pronounced 'Tawn-DRAB-bar')

"Whiteblood!" ("Bloody hell!" or "Jesus ****ing Christ!" [profane shock or disgust])

This is of course the very sort of detail dropped because of the original TSR Code of Ethics AND the desire to simplify speech (doing away with dialects/accents, and so on) to make the game more accessible when it first appeared. If your players don't feel comfortable using any of these expressions, or they seem silly when uttered, don't use them. Bane will understand. :}

So saith Ed.
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Kyrene
Senior Scribe

South Africa
705 Posts

Posted - 05 Jun 2010 :  14:32:39  Show Profile  Visit Kyrene's Homepage Send Kyrene a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rjfras

prostitute ND = coin-lass, coin-lad

Ah, yes, thanks rjfras! That will certainly help. I have barely started going through all the "So saith Ed"s, so I will get to this at a much later stage. Same with "pleasure-lass". Very important that little dash in the word...

Lost for words? Find them in the Glossary of Phrases, Sayings & Words of the Realms
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gomez
Learned Scribe

Netherlands
254 Posts

Posted - 07 Jun 2010 :  17:55:33  Show Profile  Visit gomez's Homepage Send gomez a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Kyrene
Edit: I came accross only one reference to "coinlass", and the context doesn't make it clear enough to use as a citation.
Was "pleasurelass" in the CoS novel, or the sourcebook?



In the novel. However, can't actually find it right now.
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Kyrene
Senior Scribe

South Africa
705 Posts

Posted - 07 Jun 2010 :  18:57:41  Show Profile  Visit Kyrene's Homepage Send Kyrene a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by gomez

quote:
Originally posted by Kyrene
Edit: I came accross only one reference to "coinlass", and the context doesn't make it clear enough to use as a citation.
Was "pleasurelass" in the CoS novel, or the sourcebook?



In the novel. However, can't actually find it right now.


Not to worry, mate. I found references to "coin-lass" and "pleasure-lass" (with dashes) in "So saith Ed," and will therefore add them once I get around to that. Having finished with my sourcebooks for now, I'm going to tackle any Realmslore on WotC, since those have a tendency to dissapear from time to time and is therefore of slightly higher priority.

Lost for words? Find them in the Glossary of Phrases, Sayings & Words of the Realms
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Faraer
Great Reader

3308 Posts

Posted - 03 Jul 2010 :  00:14:58  Show Profile  Visit Faraer's Homepage Send Faraer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Let me add my admiration for Kyrene's work. Two considerations to get out in the open:

1. Different sources are at different levels of immersion in the Realms vs. translation into English words and our-world assumptions -- whether we're talking about swearing, units of measure or whatever. This depends on who's writing, what they know, what editorial direction they're under, how they feel at the time, and how the work was edited. This relates to

2. Some of these terms are strictly speaking replacements for Earth-English, some run alongside it; some are the usual way of saying something, others are occasional or local or even a character's one-off coinage, sometimes several Realms terms fill the lexical space of one English one and vice versa, and it's not always clear which is which. None of the words above have the exact connotational meaning that 'prostitute' does, to give one example.
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Faraer
Great Reader

3308 Posts

Posted - 03 Jul 2010 :  00:20:29  Show Profile  Visit Faraer's Homepage Send Faraer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
'Coinlass' is used in Swords of Eveningstar; 'pleasurelass' is in Elminster: The Making of a Mage ch. 16 (The Annotated Elminster p. 255; possibly hyphenated in original edition) and appears hyphenated in Swords of Dragonfire.
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Faraer
Great Reader

3308 Posts

Posted - 04 Jul 2010 :  22:45:25  Show Profile  Visit Faraer's Homepage Send Faraer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Two more things I've mused over: What are good ways to organize a Realms glossary? What especially typical and flavourful terms might be included in a short (few-pages-long) primer?

Two such are 'battlestrike' (Swords of Eveningstar) and 'spellbolt' (Silverfall), for the spell otherwise called 'magic missile'.
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