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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
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Posted - 10 Dec 2008 :  20:39:44  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Recapping this list of oddball entries, having removed all the words Asharak has found (thanks for that! )...

quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

Year of the Adomal Tapestry, 1518
Year of the Armarel, 1210
Year of Arumae, –366
Year of the Bored Phylls, 1522
Year of the Carnivorose, 315 (A meat-eating rose?)
Year of the Eloene Bride, 548
Year of the Exploding Orl, 861
Year of the Falling Maeran, 921
Year of Glassharks, –310 (A contraction of glass sharks, perhaps?)
Year of the Gulagoar, 1316
Year of the Hungry Anelace, 597 (Analace or anlace, perhaps?)
Year of the Jasmal Blade, 851
Year of the Luminar Procession, 1127
Year of Medyoxes, –385
Year of Neomen Swords, 1448
Year of the Normiir, 611
Year of the Ormage, 102 (a contraction of orm and mage?)
Year of Rampaging Raaserpents, 699
Year of the Rising Maeran, 904
Year of the Sarune, 1206
Year of Sumbril, –217
Year of the Volanth, 655 (Volant, perhaps?)
Year of Windragons, –237 (another odd contraction, perhaps?)
Year of the Shandon Eyes, 741
Year of the Shandon Veil, 962
Year of the Sinhala, 916


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Edited by - Wooly Rupert on 12 Dec 2008 20:58:09
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Asharak
Learned Scribe

France
233 Posts

Posted - 10 Dec 2008 :  21:11:14  Show Profile  Visit Asharak's Homepage Send Asharak a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Happy if all these help
another one :

Year of the Hungry Anelace, 597


an#8901;e#8901;lace
#8194;
–noun
a short sword having a double-edged blade tapering sharply to a point: worn by civilians from the 13th to the 16th centuries.
Also, anlace.

Origin:
1250–1300; ME an(e)las < OF ale(s)naz (by metathesis), deriv. of alesne awl < OHG alasna. See awl
Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1)
Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2006.

"Soyez réalistes : demandez l'impossible"

Sorry for my English... it's not my native tongue.
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ranger_of_the_unicorn_run
Learned Scribe

USA
292 Posts

Posted - 10 Dec 2008 :  21:23:28  Show Profile Send ranger_of_the_unicorn_run a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well, according to wiki, a Luminar is a species of animorphs that "can burn its victims to ash from a few feet away"

So I guess that means that someone was a closet Animorphs fan.
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ranger_of_the_unicorn_run
Learned Scribe

USA
292 Posts

Posted - 10 Dec 2008 :  21:25:59  Show Profile Send ranger_of_the_unicorn_run a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I would guess that the Year of Raging Raaserpents is referring to the Egyptian (and decease Mulhorandi) deity Ra. I don't know exactly what year Ra was killed in the Realms, but its the only logical explanation I can come up with.
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Asharak
Learned Scribe

France
233 Posts

Posted - 12 Dec 2008 :  17:16:11  Show Profile  Visit Asharak's Homepage Send Asharak a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Year of the Sinhala, 916

On Wiktionary:

Etymology

Sanskrit #2360;#2367;#2306;#2361;#2354; (si#7747;hala), from #2360;#2367;#2306;#2361; (si#7747;há), “‘lion’”) + suffix -la that is speculatively connected to Sanskrit verbal root #8730;l#257; (“‘to seize’”) and thus the phrase would originally mean "lion-seizer" or "lion-killer", or it could be connected to Sanskrit #2354;#2379;#2361; (lohá), “‘blood’”) which would then render the phrase as "lion blood". The only thing that can with certainty be said is that this word is somehow connected with the term for lion.

According to legend, Sinhabahu or S#299;hab#257;hu ("Lion-arms"), was the son of a Vanga princess and a lion. He killed his father and became king of Vanga. His son Vijaya would emigrate to Lank#257; and become the progenitor of the Sinhala people.

"Soyez réalistes : demandez l'impossible"

Sorry for my English... it's not my native tongue.
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
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Posted - 12 Dec 2008 :  17:21:14  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Asharak

Year of the Sinhala, 916

On Wiktionary:

Etymology

Sanskrit #2360;#2367;#2306;#2361;#2354; (si#7747;hala), from #2360;#2367;#2306;#2361; (si#7747;há), “‘lion’”) + suffix -la that is speculatively connected to Sanskrit verbal root #8730;l#257; (“‘to seize’”) and thus the phrase would originally mean "lion-seizer" or "lion-killer", or it could be connected to Sanskrit #2354;#2379;#2361; (lohá), “‘blood’”) which would then render the phrase as "lion blood". The only thing that can with certainty be said is that this word is somehow connected with the term for lion.

According to legend, Sinhabahu or S#299;hab#257;hu ("Lion-arms"), was the son of a Vanga princess and a lion. He killed his father and became king of Vanga. His son Vijaya would emigrate to Lank#257; and become the progenitor of the Sinhala people.



Good stuff... All I good find for Sinhala was that it was a Sanskrit name for Sri Lanka.

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Asharak
Learned Scribe

France
233 Posts

Posted - 12 Dec 2008 :  20:16:47  Show Profile  Visit Asharak's Homepage Send Asharak a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Year of the Exploding Orl, 861

Orl : perhaps a typo

Orle :

n. 1.
1. (Her.) A bearing, in the form of a fillet, round the shield, within, but at some distance from, the border.
2. (Her.) The wreath, or chaplet, surmounting or encircling the helmet of a knight and bearing the crest.
In orle
round the escutcheon, leaving the middle of the field vacant, or occupied by something else; - said of bearings arranged on the shield in the form of an orle.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by C. & G. Merriam Co.

and :

orle (plural orles)

1. (heraldry) A bordure which runs around the outline of a shield without touching the edge.

* 1819: In his hand he bore that singular “abacus”, or staff of office, with which Templars are usually represented, having at the upper end a round plate, on which was engraved the cross of the Order, inscribed within a circle or orle, as heralds term it. — Walter Scott, Ivanhoe



"Soyez réalistes : demandez l'impossible"

Sorry for my English... it's not my native tongue.
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Asharak
Learned Scribe

France
233 Posts

Posted - 12 Dec 2008 :  20:36:34  Show Profile  Visit Asharak's Homepage Send Asharak a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Year of Medyoxes, –385

Link:
The masks this year were of apes and bagpipes, of
cats, of Greek worthies, and of ' medyoxes ' ('double visaged,
th' one syde lyke a man, th' other lyke death ')

or

Link:
A masque entitled ' The Triumph of Venus and Mara ' was de- vised by him, together with masques of apes, of the Qreek worthies, and of 'medyoxes , . . double-visaEed, th' one syde lyke a man, tli' other lyke death.'

Mod edit: Shortened the page-stretching links.

"Soyez réalistes : demandez l'impossible"

Sorry for my English... it's not my native tongue.

Edited by - Asharak on 12 Dec 2008 21:10:20
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
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Posted - 12 Dec 2008 :  21:01:21  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Ash, you are the man for taking the time to find these obscure things!

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Ifthir
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Posted - 12 Dec 2008 :  21:08:21  Show Profile  Visit Ifthir's Homepage Send Ifthir a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Steven Schend

[quote]

Damn. Thought I'd caught all of those back in 1998 when I compiled and filled in the table of years for the book department and the FR group. Funny how things like that slip by two proofreaders and an anal-retentive editor despite the best of efforts....sigh....

Well, I've no excuse other than human error. Sorry about that, folks.



Someone get Wizards of the coast a relational DB with Primary Keys! :)
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Wooly Rupert
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Posted - 12 Dec 2008 :  21:56:48  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Ifthir

quote:
Originally posted by Steven Schend

[quote]

Damn. Thought I'd caught all of those back in 1998 when I compiled and filled in the table of years for the book department and the FR group. Funny how things like that slip by two proofreaders and an anal-retentive editor despite the best of efforts....sigh....

Well, I've no excuse other than human error. Sorry about that, folks.



Someone get Wizards of the coast a relational DB with Primary Keys! :)



Some of the typos I've seen in 3E products have me convinced that spellcheckers are used sparingly, if at all, by WotC.

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Steven Schend
Forgotten Realms Designer & Author

USA
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Posted - 13 Dec 2008 :  04:35:36  Show Profile  Visit Steven Schend's Homepage Send Steven Schend a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Ifthir

quote:
Originally posted by Steven Schend

[quote]

Damn. Thought I'd caught all of those back in 1998 when I compiled and filled in the table of years for the book department and the FR group. Funny how things like that slip by two proofreaders and an anal-retentive editor despite the best of efforts....sigh....

Well, I've no excuse other than human error. Sorry about that, folks.



Someone get Wizards of the coast a relational DB with Primary Keys! :)



I originally compiled the entire list in simple MS Word tables, sorting and resorting to check and eliminate as many double-ups and such as possible. As usual, some errors crept in, despite our best efforts.

And some of these are simple puns, folks--you're thinking too hard on some. The Year of Bored Phylls? Who's the head of Books again? Yes, bad joke, but at 353am it seemed funnier. ;)

Now, if you need to know what a "bored phyll" is in FR terms, it's a tapered and well-polished baseboard carving in Amnian and Tethyrian architecture. The one common reason one might bore into these would be to pour in poisons, slip in gases, or simply to allow acces to a wizard eye.

I'll take a look at some of the others and see if my memory jogs....

Steven

For current projects and general natter, see www.steveneschend.com
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Steven Schend
Forgotten Realms Designer & Author

USA
1686 Posts

Posted - 13 Dec 2008 :  04:37:09  Show Profile  Visit Steven Schend's Homepage Send Steven Schend a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Asharak

Year of the Corrie Fist, 450
A
A round hollow in a hillside; a cirque.
[Scottish Gaelic coire, hollow, cauldron, from Old Irish, cauldron, whirlpool.]



Actually I stole that term from Scots slang; it's to mean left-handed, which applied to King Strohm of Tethyr who was missing his right hand/arm. Still, interesting lore and definitions you're finding, Asharak! Good going!

Steven

For current projects and general natter, see www.steveneschend.com
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Steven Schend
Forgotten Realms Designer & Author

USA
1686 Posts

Posted - 13 Dec 2008 :  04:45:24  Show Profile  Visit Steven Schend's Homepage Send Steven Schend a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

Recapping this list of oddball entries, having removed all the words Asharak has found (thanks for that! )...

quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

Year of the Adomal Tapestry, 1518
Year of the Armarel, 1210
Year of Arumae, –366
Year of the Bored Phylls, 1522
Year of the Carnivorose, 315 (A meat-eating rose?)
Year of the Eloene Bride, 548
Year of the Exploding Orl, 861
Year of the Falling Maeran, 921
Year of Glassharks, –310 (A contraction of glass sharks, perhaps?)
Year of the Gulagoar, 1316
Year of the Hungry Anelace, 597 (Analace or anlace, perhaps?)
Year of the Jasmal Blade, 851
Year of the Luminar Procession, 1127
Year of Medyoxes, –385
Year of Neomen Swords, 1448
Year of the Normiir, 611
Year of the Ormage, 102 (a contraction of orm and mage?)
Year of Rampaging Raaserpents, 699
Year of the Rising Maeran, 904
Year of the Sarune, 1206
Year of Sumbril, –217
Year of the Volanth, 655 (Volant, perhaps?)
Year of Windragons, –237 (another odd contraction, perhaps?)
Year of the Shandon Eyes, 741
Year of the Shandon Veil, 962
Year of the Sinhala, 916





A lot of these terms link to the work on an elven glossary I did while working on Cormanthyr, Myth Drannor, etc. I know that Sinhala has more to do with elves than Sri Lanka, but what you guys came up with is far more interesting.

A lot of the words are contractions--me slamming words together as I'm wont to do (windragon, carnivorose, etc.) just to have some fun with the language and leave a lot of room for interpretation and poetic license among the writers.

I can say that Volanth is an actual word in the Realms...but I can't for the life of me remember what it is right now...just that it's not a misspell of volant. Trust me on that, at least.

Orls and orms both have appearaed in Ed's lore in the past, as have normiir (IIRC).

Shandon is an obscure and antiquated adjective for a color--blue, methinks, but I'm sure Asharak can find this out more easily than I can. (I no longer have some of my best dictionaries and references on medieval or antiquated terminologies, alas.)

And Arumae and Sumbril are proper names for people who have an impact on history in their respective years. Whether or not it was recorded by history or had an impact beyond a local range, it was something presaged by Alaundo or Agauthra and thus in the Roll. As for what they did or who they were...another time, gentles.....

Steven

And

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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31701 Posts

Posted - 13 Dec 2008 :  07:20:33  Show Profile Send The Sage a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Steven Schend

I can say that Volanth is an actual word in the Realms...but I can't for the life of me remember what it is right now...just that it's not a misspell of volant. Trust me on that, at least.
It's been a while, but if I recall correctly, you included the Year of the Volanth reference on the timeline in Fall of Myth Drannor. Maybe it had something to do with that particular source?

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Asharak
Learned Scribe

France
233 Posts

Posted - 13 Dec 2008 :  20:26:09  Show Profile  Visit Asharak's Homepage Send Asharak a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Year of the Jasmal Blade, 851

I don't know if this make sense:

Creed Jasmal

Welcome to the Garden of Eden with this exquisite jasmine from the House of Creed! Jasmal is a light jasmine, as fresh as jasmine tea and yet a bit indolic and musky as a good jasmine is supposed to be. If you love Jean Patou Joy, here is half of the best part of the composition. It leans towards green but it's not at all sharp and astringent, wafting across soft and pure. Jasmal was notoriously created for the lovely Natalie Wood in 1959. Elegantly sweet when worn alone, it sweetens up any Creed fragrance I layer with it (although I wear it solo most often), and my favorite combination is with their absolutely gorgeous rose scent in Creed's Private Collection line, Fleur de Thé Rose Bulgare (1890), a very lively and fresh rose with a robust heart and a musky dry down (not to be confused with their other rose scent, Fleurs De Bulgarie (1980), a much heavier, muskier rose). Jasmal is a cheerful smile with a golden touch of Italian daffodil.

"Soyez réalistes : demandez l'impossible"

Sorry for my English... it's not my native tongue.
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Asharak
Learned Scribe

France
233 Posts

Posted - 13 Dec 2008 :  21:13:57  Show Profile  Visit Asharak's Homepage Send Asharak a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Year of the Luminar Procession, 1127

Carmina Burana

Blanziflor Et Helena
"Ave formosissima"

(Choeur)
Ave formosissima, (Je salue la plus belle,)
gemma pretiosa, (precieux joyau,)
ave decus virginum, (Je salue la gloire de la vierge,)
virgo gloriosa, (glorieuse vierge,)
ave mundi luminar, (Je salue la lumiere du monde,)
ave mundi rosa, (Je salue la rose du monde,)
Blanziflor et Helena, (Blanche-fleur et Helene,)
Venus generosa! (noble Venus!)

So Luminar can be translated by Light

"Soyez réalistes : demandez l'impossible"

Sorry for my English... it's not my native tongue.

Edited by - Asharak on 14 Dec 2008 17:59:46
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Steven Schend
Forgotten Realms Designer & Author

USA
1686 Posts

Posted - 14 Dec 2008 :  13:34:32  Show Profile  Visit Steven Schend's Homepage Send Steven Schend a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Asharak

Year of the Luminar Procession, 1127

Carmina Burana

Blanziflor Et Helena
"Ave formosissima"

(Choeur)
Ave formosissima, (Je salue la plus belle,)
gemma pretiosa, (pr�cieux joyau,)
ave decus virginum, (Je salue la gloire de la vierge,)
virgo gloriosa, (glorieuse vierge,)
ave mundi luminar, (Je salue la lumi�re du monde,)
ave mundi rosa, (Je salue la rose du monde,)
Blanziflor et Helena, (Blanche-fleur et H�l�ne,)
Venus generosa! (noble V�nus!)

So Luminar can be translated by Light



Yup--the vision of Alaundo's was a procession of lights.

Could be a parade of nyths or will-o-wisp....could be a poorly viewed collective of elves with lanterns....

As with many of the year names, they're left vague and open so many DMs can have as many answers to what's a big deal in that year as possible. Look at the year of Lightning Storms and how many different events could have been the reason for the year name as a canonical example.

Steven
who's enjoying Ash's digging at the obscurities

PS: I think Jasmal might have been made up by me or Ed, but I'm not sure. The year name MIGHT refer to the historic blade-maker Jasmal of Impiltur, whose works were said to remain vorpal-sharp for centuries without the aid of magic.

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Asharak
Learned Scribe

France
233 Posts

Posted - 14 Dec 2008 :  13:41:09  Show Profile  Visit Asharak's Homepage Send Asharak a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Year of the Bored Phylls, 1522

I find this:

Biology Prefixes and Suffixes: -phyll

Definition: suffix (-phyll) - leaf
Examples: sporophyll (sporo-phyll ) - leaf that contains spores

[From Greek phullon, leaf; see phyllo-.]

"Soyez réalistes : demandez l'impossible"

Sorry for my English... it's not my native tongue.
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
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Posted - 14 Dec 2008 :  15:34:38  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Steven Schend


PS: I think Jasmal might have been made up by me or Ed, but I'm not sure. The year name MIGHT refer to the historic blade-maker Jasmal of Impiltur, whose works were said to remain vorpal-sharp for centuries without the aid of magic.



That makes more sense than a perfumed blade.

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Wooly Rupert
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Posted - 14 Dec 2008 :  15:39:42  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
There were originally like 40 oddball entries... Thanks to Asharak and esteemed sage Schend, we've whittled it down to 13... And among those 13, there are two pairs, so really, only eleven oddballs to go!

quote:
Year of the Adomal Tapestry, 1518
Year of the Armarel, 1210
Year of the Eloene Bride, 548
Year of the Falling Maeran, 921
Year of the Gulagoar, 1316
Year of Neomen Swords, 1448
Year of the Normiir, 611 (Steven says this is in Realmslore, but the definition remains unknown)
Year of Rampaging Raaserpents, 699
Year of the Rising Maeran, 904
Year of the Sarune, 1206
Year of the Volanth, 655
Year of the Shandon Eyes, 741
Year of the Shandon Veil, 962 (Steven says shandon may be a shade of blue; I've not yet been able to find that definition, but I'd like to confirm it)

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Wooly Rupert
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Posted - 14 Dec 2008 :  15:44:34  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I still can't find jack on "eloene". I found some references to "eleone", though. Some are references to some sort of dance, and "eleones" is Greek for olive groves... Something about a dancing bride works better, but I'd still like a better definition.

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Asharak
Learned Scribe

France
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Posted - 14 Dec 2008 :  18:10:35  Show Profile  Visit Asharak's Homepage Send Asharak a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by Steven Schend


PS: I think Jasmal might have been made up by me or Ed, but I'm not sure. The year name MIGHT refer to the historic blade-maker Jasmal of Impiltur, whose works were said to remain vorpal-sharp for centuries without the aid of magic.



That makes more sense than a perfumed blade.



I agree

For Shandon, I only found some brand.
The only thing with a blue colour is a brand who make Blue Shandon with blue methylene...

"Soyez réalistes : demandez l'impossible"

Sorry for my English... it's not my native tongue.
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Asharak
Learned Scribe

France
233 Posts

Posted - 14 Dec 2008 :  20:09:48  Show Profile  Visit Asharak's Homepage Send Asharak a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Year of the Rising Maeran, 904
Year of the Falling Maeran, 921

I found this:

Wikisource
Beowulf/Glossary

m#483;re, adj., _memorable; celebrated, noble; well known, notorious_: nom. sg. m. m#483;re, 103, 129, 1716, 1762; se m#483;ra, 763, 2012, 2588; also as vocative m. se m#483;ra, 1475; nom. fem. m#483;ru, 2017; m#483;re, 1953; neut. m#483;re, 2406; acc. sg. m. m#483;rne, 36, 201, 353, 1599, 2385, 2722, 2789, 3099; neut. m#483;re, 1024; dat. sg. m#483;rum, 345, 1302, 1993, 2080, 2573; t#333; þ#483;m m#483;ran, 270; gen. sg. m#483;res, 798; m#483;ran, 1730; nom. pl. m#483;re, 3071; superl. m#483;rost, 899,--Comp.: fore-, heaðo-m#483;re.

I don't know if it makes a lot of sense...

"Soyez réalistes : demandez l'impossible"

Sorry for my English... it's not my native tongue.
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Wooly Rupert
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Posted - 14 Dec 2008 :  20:53:18  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
It does... I just did some searching of my own, and after refining the search several times and then searching several pages, I found a couple of references to it meaning "glorious" or "famous" in Old English. Which lead me to realize I've got an Old English dictionary program; looking in there, "mæ" seems to mean something important or well-known.

Our rising and falling maeran, then, could be some famous or noteworthy person.

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Wooly Rupert
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Posted - 14 Dec 2008 :  21:07:01  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hmmm... Another Old English dictionary has a listing for "neoman"; it says to check "niman". And "niman" means to take or seize; some of the definitions imply the use of force for the taking and seizing. So Neoman Swords is prolly a reference to something being taken by force of arms.

The same dictionary didn't have "sarune", but it had sárung, with a "-e" in parentheses behind it. So if I'm reading the other entries correctly, sárune would be the plurization of sárung. And sárung means "mourning, lamentation". So the year of the lamentations, which works.

Armarel wasn't in there, either. I looked for "ærm", and it routed me to "earm", which is arm. So armarel could be something related to the arms, particularly something worn. Of course, "earm" is also related to sorrow...

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Edited by - Wooly Rupert on 14 Dec 2008 21:23:01
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Asharak
Learned Scribe

France
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Posted - 15 Dec 2008 :  17:14:39  Show Profile  Visit Asharak's Homepage Send Asharak a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

Hmmm... Another Old English dictionary has a listing for "neoman"; it says to check "niman". And "niman" means to take or seize; some of the definitions imply the use of force for the taking and seizing. So Neoman Swords is prolly a reference to something being taken by force of arms.

The same dictionary didn't have "sarune", but it had sárung, with a "-e" in parentheses behind it. So if I'm reading the other entries correctly, sárune would be the plurization of sárung. And sárung means "mourning, lamentation". So the year of the lamentations, which works.

Armarel wasn't in there, either. I looked for "ærm", and it routed me to "earm", which is arm. So armarel could be something related to the arms, particularly something worn. Of course, "earm" is also related to sorrow...



Good stuff

I don't recognize the next one:
-50/Year of the Phandar

If you know what this word is...

"Soyez réalistes : demandez l'impossible"

Sorry for my English... it's not my native tongue.
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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
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Posted - 15 Dec 2008 :  18:04:08  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message  Reply with Quote
For Armarel, I think using both would be cool - 'Armarel' could be a type of sorrow caused by arms.

In other words, many small battlles could have been fought that year, leading to much grieving over the fallen.

Ergo, 'Armarel' = 'Battle Grief'

As for Maeran - In Greek Mythology, Hecuba was named Maera after being changed into a dog for blinding Polymestor. Ergo, Maeran might be a reference to a group of (cursed) dogs.

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone


Edited by - Markustay on 15 Dec 2008 18:06:58
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
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Posted - 15 Dec 2008 :  18:22:09  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Asharak

I don't recognize the next one:
-50/Year of the Phandar

If you know what this word is...



Phandar is a type of tree, described on page 62 of the formerly suppressed work () Volo's Guide to All Things Magical, which you can download for free from the Wizards downloads page.

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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
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USA
36123 Posts

Posted - 15 Dec 2008 :  18:22:54  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

For Armarel, I think using both would be cool - 'Armarel' could be a type of sorrow caused by arms.

In other words, many small battlles could have been fought that year, leading to much grieving over the fallen.

Ergo, 'Armarel' = 'Battle Grief'

As for Maeran - In Greek Mythology, Hecuba was named Maera after being changed into a dog for blinding Polymestor. Ergo, Maeran might be a reference to a group of (cursed) dogs.



I don't think that works as well, because how would a group of dogs rise or fall?

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